American journalism

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Introduction

The Encyclopedia of American Journalism explores in depth those journalists and their organizations who have observed and recorded the events of American history. In 1930, John H. Finley of the New York Times said that journalists were "the historians More...

ASSOCIATIONS AND ORGANIZATIONS

These articles detail groups that support or regulate journalists' work from "American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE)" to "Women's Press Organizations." Some are gov­ernmental, such as the "Office of War Information" More...

HISTORICAL OVERVIEW AND PRACTICE

These articles cover the whole scope of American history; however, special attention has been given to developments since 1945 and the end of World War II. Where earlier refer­ence works in the field tend to trail off after the mid-twentieth century, More...

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ABBOTT, ROBERT S

The story of Robert Sengstacke Abbot's (Nov. 24, 1870-Feb. 29, 1940) life and eventual success in newspaper publishing epitomizes the challenges educated and enterprising Afri­can Americans faced during the Jim Crow and Progressive eras. It also embodies More...

Further Reading

Doreski, C. K. "From News to History: Robert Abbott and Carl Sandburg Read the 1919 Chicago Riot." African American Review 26, no. 4 (Winter, 1992).

--------- . Writing America Black: Race Rhetoric and the Public

Sphere. New York: Cambridge More...

AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPANY (ABC) NEWS

ABC News helped to bring broadcast journalism fully into the television age. It was one of the "big three" networks prior to the growth of cable and satellite TV. Yet when ABC began, CBS and NBC already were broadcast news institutions. ABC's More...

Further Reading

Craig Allen, News Is People: The Rise of Local TV News and the Fall of News from New York. Ames: Iowa State Press, 2001. Ken Auletta, Three Blind Mice: How the TV Networks Lost Their

Way. New York: Random House, 1991. James B. Duffy, The Wind in the More...

ABOLITIONIST PRESS

Beginning around 1830, some American anti-slavery activ­ists known as abolitionists or immediatists undertook to emancipate all slaves and to grant them full rights and U. S. citizenship. Many abolitionists were Christian evangelists to whom ending slavery More...